Student Art Events

by Zina Josephs

1. Dia de los Muertos opening – October 29

2. The Crucible – November 5 – 14

3. Cabaret – November 5 and 6

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1. DIA DE LOS MUERTOS ART SHOW AND CELEBRATION

Santa Monica High School

There will be a free catered buffet, music, and of course, ART! Danny Flores is the featured professional artist this year and alongside the advanced work of the SAMO students, both JAMS intermediate and advanced year-long art classes will also display their art work proudly. Questions? Please contact Jen West, Art Teacher JAMS, jwest@smmusd.org

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Support Santa Monica’s High School’s young actors

Come see:

THE CRUCIBLE written by Arthur Miller

Humanities Center Theater

November 5-14, 7:00 PM

Thursdays, Fridays & Saturdays

Tickets: www.samohitheatre.org

310 395-3204 ext. 239

Adults: $10 Students: $5

Presenting Sponsor: Santa Monica-Malibu Education Foundation

Santa Monica High School’s new theater director Darryl Hovis challenges Samohi students to tackle “The Crucible”, Arthur Miller’s classic parable of mass hysteria. The play draws a chilling parallel between the Salem witch-hunt of 1692 – ‘one of the strangest and most awful chapters in human history’, McCarthyism which gripped America in the 1950s, and most recently the backlash against Muslims following the 2001 attacks on New York City’s twin towers. Santa Monica High School actors breathe life into this story of a small Salem community stirred into madness by superstition, paranoia and malice born of the terrifying power of false accusations.

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Cabaret is coming! – Malibu High School

Posted by: “poseyjungle”

Wed Oct 28, 2009 8:29 am (PDT)

What good is sitting alone in your room? Come hear the music play – Come to the Cabaret!

The Malibu High School Choral Music Department will present its annual fall fundraiser Cabaret on Thursday, November 5th and Friday, November 6th at 7:00 PM. The evening will showcase MHS’s award winning choral ensembles as well as soloists from the middle and high school vocal music programs. A special opening number will feature fourth and fifth grade students from Juan Cabrillo, Pt. Dume, and Webster Elementary Schools singing along with the MHS Choirs.

Tickets for Cabaret may be purchased at lunchtime, from MHS choral students, or from choir director Amy Loch at aloch@smmusd.org. Tickets purchased before November 5th are $15 for adults and $10 for students: at the door, all seats will be $20 for adults and $15 for students. Proceeds from the concert will be used to fund this year’s choral music productions and field trips.

This is always a popular show, so don’t be disappointed – buy your tickets NOW!

Additional events are listed on the district’s VAPA website at www.smmusd.org/vapa/, click on “Calendar”

To: City Council members

Dear Honorable Councilmembers,

Regarding the Exposition Light Rail agenda item 8-A, the Friends of Sunset Park Board has the following three concerns:

(1) safety issues, (2) noise issues, and (3) the proposed land swap with SMC.

1. We support the letter from the Pico Neighborhood Association Board (see below) wconcerning the proximity of the proposed Expo maintenance facility to Stewart Park. The park is built on land fill, with the seepage of methane gas associated with land fills. The combination of this gas and possible ignition and explosion hazards posed by the maintenance yard could result in a serious health and safety issue that cannot be ignored. This must be studied carefully before any decisions are made about the location of the maintenance facility. Many of us still remember the 1985 explosion in a Ross department store in the Third and Fairfax area. 23 people were injured, and the explosion was apparently caused by methane gas ventings. The safety of residents must be the highest priority of city government.

2. Aside from the safety issue, we continue to be concerned about the negative impact of daily 5 AM to 1 AM noise from the maintenance facility operations on nearby residents and the effect on their health and quality of life.

3. Regarding the proposal that the city “work with SMC on identification of Airport residual land as replacement parking and possible terms for a land swap,” we respectfully remind the City Council about the issues that arose when SMC developed its Bundy Campus and proposed to use all of Airport Avenue for access to the Bundy Campus parking lot. The eventual resolution was that college traffic was restricted to “exit-only, eastbound-only” on the eastern portion of Airport Avenue.

The Level of Service (LOS) at the intersection of Airport, Dewey, Walgrove, and 23rd, at the west end of Airport Avenue is already rated “F” for northbound and southbound drivers. 23rd St. already has 24,000 daily car trips on a street that, according to city policy, should have no more than 15,000.

In addition to the terrible traffic congestion on 23rd St. during both morning and evening rush hours, Sunset Park residents living south of Ocean Park Blvd., both east and west of 23rd St., are already at risk from speeding cut-through traffic on their narrow streets and through the alleys behind their homes as commuters try to by-pass gridlocked sections of 23rd.

The FOSP Board will strongly oppose any plan to funnel additional SMC traffic into the intersection of Airport, Dewey, Walgrove, and 23rd.

Give It Up, City!

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At tonight’s City Council meeting,   the staff will ask the Council to

“1.  Authorize the City Manager to continue to work with the Exposition Construction Authority (Expo) to further explore and mitigate the effects of the proposed Phase 2 Exposition Light Rail maintenance facility, including the proposed alternative concept ‘hybrid’ maintenance facility site which consists of the Verizon property and the Santa Monica College (SMC) parking lot as the location for the maintenance facility… Such an alternative will include a tightly configured storage and maintenance facility on the Verizon/SMC site adjacent to the railroad right of way, and a linear buffer of 100 – 110 feet for most of the frontage facing residents on Exposition Boulevard…?

City manager Lamont Ewell is a very smart and capable executive,  but he’s not a magician, and only a magician could make the site acceptable. Mere mitigation won’t do it.

Read the Open Letter from PNA (below). Quite simply, it’s the wrong location. There are several other more suitable locations on the Expo right of way, and it’s time for the City to pay more attention to its residents than to the Espo tean,

Wilmont Protests Downtown Parking Plan

Mayor Genser and Honorable Council Members:

Our board and other members of the Wilshire/Montana Neighborhood Coalition have asked me to send a letter protesting the Council’s recent plan to change downtown parking fees. The decision to raise rates and lower the free parking to one hour is EXTREMELY unpopular. Every person at our recent meeting agreed that this decision will make life more difficult for residents and will limit their willingness and ability to use the promenade businesses.

If the primary problem is employees misusing the 2-hour limit, then create a policy to address that problem. Surely a plan could be devised that solves “the employee shuffle” without penalizing all the rest of us who live here. If outlying lots are being underutilized, institute a program that would require employees to use those lots instead. Lowering rates at those lots and instituting shuttle service also seem to be positive steps. Other creative solutions could be devised that address the problem without harming local businesses and inconveniencing residents.

Council Members should be aware that this plan is being publicly perceived as yet one more step in the City’s ongoing, misguided efforts to limit citizens’ mobility and parking. With City Council elections coming up next year, this unpopular parking plan is not something voters will soon forget.

Sincerely,

Jeanne Dodso

Wilmont Chair

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Mayor Genser and Honorable Council Members:

Our board and other members of the Wilshire/Montana Neighborhood Coalition have asked me to send a letter protesting the Council’s recent plan to change downtown parking fees. The decision to raise rates and lower the free parking to one hour is EXTREMELY unpopular. Every person at our recent meeting agreed that this decision will make life more difficult for residents and will limit their willingness and ability to use the promenade businesses.

If the primary problem is employees misusing the 2-hour limit, then create a policy to address that problem. Surely a plan could be devised that solves “the employee shuffle” without penalizing all the rest of us who live here. If outlying lots are being underutilized, institute a program that would require employees to use those lots instead. Lowering rates at those lots and instituting shuttle service also seem to be positive steps. Other creative solutions could be devised that address the problem without harming local businesses and inconveniencing residents.

Council Members should be aware that this plan is being publicly perceived as yet one more step in the City’s ongoing, misguided efforts to limit citizens’ mobility and parking. With City Council elections coming up next year, this unpopular parking plan is not something voters will soon forget.

Sincerely,

Jeanne Dodso

Wilmont Chair

LUCE: More Questions Than Answers

A line from “The Misfits” is apropos: “If it weren’t for nervous people, people would still be eating each other.”

If Santa Monica residents aren’t sufficiently nervous about City Hall’s long-overdue revision of the land use and circulation elements of the General Plan (LUCE) to demand significant changes in it, we can all look forward to the reduction of this gloriously idiosyncratic beach town to a mere money mill,

From the beginning, in 2004, residents and CityHall have been at odds over LUCE. Still reeling from the explosion of commercial development – over 9 million square feet in two-plus decades, residents wanted LESS, but City Hall doesn’t believe in less.

A seismic shift had occurred as Santa Monicans for Renters’ Rights secured its grip on the City machinery. The town had always been the main thing, but, on SMRR’s watch, City Hall has become the main thing, and its top priority is increasing its own revenue.

It was in this crass climate that City staff and a fleet of uber-consultants conjured the planning nightmare that is LUCE.

City staff enjoys saying that “thousands” of residents have taken part in their community workshops. But residents who have attended said workshops report that not only were the sessions “rigged,” but the majority of the participants were City staff, architects, developers and other people with financial interests in the outcome.

The flaws in the LUCE, based on the material we’ve seen so far, are serious, as they derive from conventional bureaucratic assumptions: grow or die, economics trumps aesthetics, new eclipses old, and so on.

In short, City Hall sees Santa Monica as a stage set, which it can change at will. That addled view seems to be the basis for the LUCE revision.

In fact, it’s a complex place, made by its location on the ocean, weather, layers of history, a lush landscape, an endless procession of iconoclasts, lucid light, and oceanic air. In Santa Monica, palm trees outgrow the flimsy soil in which they’re set.

It was, with Malibu, the epicenter of surfing, and ground zero for the Z-boys.

Four World Cruisers, 50,000 DC airplanes and one flying car were built here.

All of that, and more, is in Santa Monica’s bones. None of it’s in LUCE.

Conventional assumptions simply don’t work here, which accounts for the flaws in the LUCE.

It conveys no sense of place, or the whole, but divides it into discrete parts.

Downtown Santa Monica, which has suffered major planning insults in recent years (see LIGHTS OUT below), the “hospital district,” or the blob that ate midtown Santa Monica, and the Civic Center, which makes chaos seem attractive, are very large, centrally located and integral to the city. If they don’t work, the city won’t work, but, inexplicably, they have been excluded from the LUCE process.

Apparently, a specific plan will be developed for each of the three after the LUCE revision is complete. But the revision won’t be complete until these three key areas are included. So, after waiting four years for the LUCE, we will only see the LU–,

Other flawed pieces of the puzzle that is being sold as a plan are called “activity centers.” No hoops, chess boards or karate classes here. The principal “activity” is large scale massed commercial developments. Located on the so-called connnercial and/or transit corridors, they would displace loose arrangements of existing free-standing, one or two- story cafes, stores and shops with clusters of massive five and six-story buildings. These tall, heavy commercial installations will fracture the townscape, cast long, noisy shadows across residential neighbors and play havoc with existing businesses.

Members of the Wilshire-Montana Neighborhood Organization, on being shown plans for an activity center at Wilshire and 14th , gave it a definite thumbs down. That’s the only rational response. The sole beneficiary is City

Hall. Its drive for new commercial development and the revenue it generates has caused most of Santa Monica’s most serious problems.

A draft of the LUCE will be presented to the City Council on Tuesday, November 24.

City staff will begin the Environmental Impact Report process later this month, and the draft LUCE will be reviewed by various City boards and commissions, before the November 24th Council meeting.

Check the City website for the times, dates, and places of the various meetings.

The official LUCE site is http://shapethefuture2025.net/

Read the draft LUCE, attend some or all of the meetings. Speak up. Bad or good, it’ll be the rule for the next 14 years.

(to be continued)

Note: Arthur Miller wrote “The Misfits,”